Question about recommended cold-calling ranges  

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Arvetis
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September 30, 2017 6:58 am  

Hi, I just had a question about the video "A More In-Depth and Detailed Look at Cold-Calling Ranges." In your recommended cold-calling ranges against an UTG raise from MP, you include the suited connectors JTs-98s and KQs. I assume that this is because of the implied odds, even though they're a bit of a dog against a standard UTG raise range. But I was wondering why QJs was omitted. Is there something that gives that hand worse implied odds? Thanks!


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Arvetis
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September 30, 2017 9:48 am  

Oh, and another question I forgot about - I noticed some of the cold-calling charts include hands we normally wouldn't be holding in the first place if we were strictly following your opening ranges.  For example, 98s-T9s in MP. Did you include those in case we decide to open up our ranges based on our opponents, or am I misunderstanding something?


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Alton - MicroGrinder Poker
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October 2, 2017 4:38 am  

The lower equity hands are "optional" hands you can call for implied odds. A hand like QJs is excluded because its easily dominated by QK, AQ whereas lower suited connectors aren't.

The more in depth look show a much wider range of hands including gap theory and implied odds hands. You don't need to call with suited connectors, but they're an option.


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Arvetis
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October 3, 2017 12:22 pm  

Thanks!  To clarify, you would recommend optionally considering calling a raise with, for example, 98s in MP against a raise for the implied odds, but not opening it against a fold or call from UTG, right? At least in the style you're teaching here?


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Alton - MicroGrinder Poker
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October 4, 2017 1:20 pm  

Pre-flop ranges aren't static, they're dynamic and should be adjusted for every unique situation. The ranges provided in the course are a "starting point" guideline that you shouldn't use strictly, but learn to properly deviate from them. Weaker equity hands like suited one gappers, suited connectors, weaker suited aces, small pocket pairs, etc. play well where you have good implied odds (playing deep stacked, whale playing at your table, etc). In the correct situation, you can call 98s versus a range from any position, which you should learn over time as your improve your game. This course is a beginner's course, so understanding how to dynamically adjust your ranges will come with time. Hopefully this gives you a bit more insight into my answer and didn't make it more complex.


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Arvetis
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October 7, 2017 11:21 am  

I understand they're not static, hence the way I phrased the question in the second post. I was looking for the specific reasons there are ranges in the "default" recommended calling ranges that aren't in the recommended opening ranges. You didn't comment on it in the video, so I was looking for the specific kinds of situations we should be looking for to play those kinds of hands.

I was using 98s from MP as an example because it was probably the least-complicated option of those hands. Not super-far off the opening range, only one potential limper, etc.


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Alton - MicroGrinder Poker
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October 9, 2017 9:35 am  

The default calling ranges are conservative ranges based upon conservative open-raising ranges.

The ranges in the the "more in-depth" calling ranges video are based upon more aggressive opening-raising defending ranges as the cold-caller, that's why there are more hands in those defending ranges. Also, this video shows position vs. position ranges, whereas the others don't so they're much more detailed.

In general, with our calling ranges (I don't talk about this in course) but our calling ranges are composed of Gap Theory plus lower equity (implied odds) hands. When we are defending against more aggressive ranges, our Gap Theory hands will be more hands, as will in certain situations, our lower equity (implied odds) hands.

Hope that clears things up.


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Arvetis
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October 14, 2017 7:48 pm  

Thanks! It's definitely food for thought. Do you have any other courses that go into more detail about these kinds of preflop considerations? I feel like I'm a little dogmatic with my preflop play and I'd like to learn how to be more dynamic. I saw that you have a course about opening up your preflop ranges, but I'm not specifically interested in opening up necessarily, just being more dynamic.


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Alton - MicroGrinder Poker
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October 15, 2017 4:32 am  

You're welcome. My book that I'm currently writing goes into great detail regarding pre-flop theory and strategy - much more than my video courses. I would highly recommend you give it a read once its released (in November hopefully). I have eight chapters dedicated to pre-flop play in it.


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