Pot sized bet. Lecture 11.2 Betting with the best hand  

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Peppermill
(@peppermill)
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August 14, 2016 11:01 pm  

Hi Alton,

 

In lecture 11.2 (around 2 minutes 16 seconds in) the pot on the flop is 60 cents, P1 bets 30 cents and you make it 99 cents to go and you say you "make it just over a pot-sized bet". A pot-sized bet however would have been $1.50 Because: 60 cents in the pot, a 30 cents bet makes the pot 90 cents. You call the 30 cents making the pot $1,20. So a pot sized raise would be $1.20 + 30 cents = $1.50

 

Regards,

 

Peppermill


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Alton - MicroGrinder Poker
(@microgrinder)
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August 16, 2016 1:49 pm  

Hi Peppermill - thanks for pointing that out. You're correct, a pot-sized would be based upon this rule, "You can raise the amount that is in the pot after you have called the previous bet" so technically a pot-sized raise would include my call and then a raise the size of the pot ($0.90 + $0.30 villain bet + $0.30 hero call = $1.50). I don't play a lot of pot-limit poker and the semantics of what I was trying to say was off. I was raising a bit more than what was currently in the pot in the hand, not making a maximum pot-sized raise that you could do in a pot-limit game.

I think the biggest take away from this hand is that we flop the nuts, but it is a wet board texture where villain most likely has a strong draw he is likely to call a raise with so we are betting for value + protection by raising here.


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Markku
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September 16, 2016 3:19 pm  

I am always confused with the bet sizes when reading poker books. For instance, the writer says somebody is raising to X dollars, then in some other spot somebody is making a two thirds pot-sized raise making the pot X dollars. Many times I have tried to calculate backwards to resolve what the betting was and what the bets should have been if I wanted to end up in the same original pot size as was in the book. My arithmetic rarely gets me to that goal.

In the preceding discussion I understand that: "a pot-sized raise would include my call and then a raise the size of the pot ($0.90 + $0.30 villain bet + $0.30 hero call = $1.50)", where the original pot size is 90 cents.

But I don't understand that: "A pot-sized bet however would have been $1.50 Because: 60 cents in the pot, a 30 cents bet makes the pot 90 cents. You call the 30 cents making the pot $1,20. So a pot sized raise would be $1.20 + 30 cents = $1.50", where the original pot size is 60 cents.

Where does the additional 30 cents in the end of the latter come from? The original pot size in the latter is 60 cents but in the previous it is 90 cents, and in both cases the pot-sized raise is the same: 1.50 dollars. Amazing!


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Alton - MicroGrinder Poker
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September 17, 2016 3:13 am  

It's a pot-sized poker concept, such as pot limit omaha. I don't know why they (whoever created the game) decided on making that a pot-sized bet.

For no limit holdem, you can ignore the concept and worry more about the pot odds price you are offering your opponent whenever you are betting with the best hand. You need to look at (1) your opponent's range, (2) how it connects with the board, (3) their likely draws, (4) their equity of hitting their hand, (5) the pot odds price you need to offer them to make their call -EV via pot odds and (6) how much they're likely to call.


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